What to do when you experience a property insurance claim

Property Insurance Claim


Insurance claim

When you pay your premiums every year on time and the day comes that you have to file an insurance claim you expect the best service and to be taken care of. When you experience damages to your home whether it be from water damages, fire damage, mold, or trauma you can file an insurance claim. You can file a claim in multiple different ways.

The first and way that we typically recommend is calling your insurance agent and explaining the damages to them. We recommend this way, because they will be able to tell you what your deductible is and they will know whether or not it is worth it to file a claim with the damages you have experienced. In some instances it is better not to file an insurance claim. Insurance claims actually can put a negative point on your policy or your carrier can send a letter removing you as a policyholder.

The second way you can file is calling the 1-800 number to your carrier. This may seem like the best 24/7 option if it is an emergency situation, but it is still preferable you call your agency. In some instances calling the 1-800 number may provide you with quicker service, but it will also take longer and put you through with someone that is unfamiliar from another state.

Another option is to call an emergency restoration contractor who would be able to help walk you through the process and give you their personal opinion on the damages and if it could be a claim. The reason why this is a good option too, because you have the choice in this instance to pick the contractor you wish to use. The other two options your insurance carrier would push you to use a “preferred vendor” and that is not always the best option for you.

After you file your insurance claim it is time to get it cleaned up. As a policyholder you have the option to pick the contractor. However, many times insurance carriers are pushing policyholders to use contractors that they pick. This has become a hot topic in the industry and in our opinion it is better to do your own research and pick your own company. A lot of “preferred vendors” technically work for the carriers, when they should be working for you as the policyholder. At Veterans Restoration we work for our customers not the insurance carriers, because we want to do what’s best for the customer not the carrier.

The insurance carriers want to cut corners and cut margins from the restoration contractor, because it helps save them money on their margins. It is hard to hear that the company that you have been paying for years will turn around and cut corners or not pay your contractor in a reasonable time. Either way, we personally recommend you do your own research into local independent restoration contractors like Veterans Restoration. As a local veteran owned company we take pride in our work and take the time to explain the process in detail with our customers.

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.